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Monthly Archives: April 2010

Titled “Different Destinies”, I shot this somewhere in Northern Thailand. I was intrigued by the layers of trees as well as the riders as their paths crossed. I chose an aperature opening of
F22 to provide the greatest depth of field (meaning things in the foreground remain as sharp as the background). An F 2.8 setting would have kept only the bikes in focus.

That headline ALWAYS gets attention, for obvious reasons. But, if you want to see the world in a different way go to http://inmotion.magnumphotos.com/essays You’ll find powerful photo essays that will touch your heart and change your mind (maybe). I use the site as resource in my photo essay classes. The photo essay had its start back in the 30’s when cameras became more accessable and utilitarian. They made people think…critically…about the issues of the day. I fear that “critical thinking” (where people step back and look at both sides of issues) is sadly lacking in today’s public discourse. What do you think?

I wish I could say American based airlines are better than carriers from foreign countries, but my recent trip to Asia include a great experience with Thai Airways and a bad one with a US owned carrier. This contrast is true on most of my trips. It boils down to HOW I am treated by flight attendants. Foreign carriers, for the most part, focus on me. Complete with smiles. My flight back on a US carrier was “highlighted” by flight crew talking more to each other than to passengers- with one complaining about her schedule. US airline personal can point to financial trauma, buyouts, and fuel costs as reasons. I don’t care. I want the care I get overseas. -www.SLMphoto.com

A comment about angles (on two levels). First, the attached image (click on Steven L. Miller Photography) “works” because I wanted – and achieved- a more aerial view of this Thai merchant.
Also, from a media perspective, local Thai papers took a “sensational” view of the recent Red Shirt protests I witnessed. Yes, things were dicey- but major front page stories made events look like WWIII.